Categories
Beef Cabbage Carrots Celery Olive Oil Onions Tomatoes

Cabbage Rolls

Words and Photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms

The classic cabbage roll dish that we generally think of is an Eastern European ancestral food, commonly incorporating tender cabbage leaves stuffed with a filling of rice, ground beef and aromatics then gently braised in a simple tomato sauce. However, this comforting combination turns up in many global cuisines like Asia, Europe, and North Africa. 

This is a method recipe and once you have the basics down, it’s infinitely adaptable to seasonal changes and flavor preferences. For instance, in the fall I make one with a filling of roasted sweet potatoes, apples, and quinoa finished with a cinnamon spiced tomato sauce. It is divine. It also doesn’t have to be cabbage! Swap in collards or even Swiss chard. Heck, if greens aren’t your thing, the sauce and filling would be delightful tossed with pasta and baked.

Though the results are worth it, because of the rolling process this recipe does take some time and is best as a weekend cooking project as opposed to a weeknight dinner. However, we love the flavors of cabbage rolls so much that on weeknights we apply the flavors in different ways like in a soup or meatballs

Ingredients

  • 1 large head of green cabbage
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 small to medium onion, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 small carrots, shredded
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped small
  • 2-4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup uncooked rice
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 3 to 4 cups of your favorite simple tomato sauce, my favorite is here

Directions

  1. Cut the core out of the cabbage, but leave it whole.  Place the cabbage in a large bowl with the cored part facing up. Boil a small pot of water and pour the water over the cabbage and let it sit for 10-15 minutes.
  1. Heat the oil in a sauté pan. Cook the onions until they are soft, and add the carrot and celery. Sauté them for a couple of minutes, until they are soft. Add the minced garlic and season the mixture with salt and pepper. Transfer it to a bowl and let it cool a bit. Mix in the meat, rice and tomato paste and season again with salt and pepper.
  2. In a large Dutch oven (or large pot with a lid), heat your tomato sauce (or make it). 
  3. Drain the head of cabbage. Pull off large leaves, trying not to rip the leaf. Cut out the large vein — if the leaf is very large, you can make two rolls from each, if it is smaller, you can cut the vein out partially and pull the sides to overlap before you roll it into one roll. Pat the leaves dry with towels. 

Roll about 1/4 to 1/3 cup of filling in each leaf. Place each roll in the pot. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat, letting them simmer covered on the stove on low for about 45 minutes. Serve immediately.

Categories
Beets Dill Garlic Olive Oil

Beet & Dill Salad

Words and Photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms

This is a super simple recipe that comes together with only a few minutes of hands-on time. The longest part is cooking the beets. The recipe instructions below are for using an Instant Pot, but if you don’t have one or use one, you can simply roast the beets in the oven. I like to wrap whole beets in parchment or foil. Roast at 350 for about an hour, or until you can easily pierce a knife all the way through. 

You can do this with any kind of beet, but the chioggia beet is a personal favorite. Their beautiful stripes make it visually appealing, and it is super-sweet, with a slightly more subtle flavor than a traditional beet. A golden beet would be great too! 

Ingredients 

  • 1 bundle of beets, preferably chioggia beets
  • 1 can of beans, white or chickpea, drained and rinsed
  • ¼ cup chopped dill 
  • 1 lemon, juiced 
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced or grated 
  • 2 TB EVOO
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 TB chopped chives and chive flowers for garnish

Directions

  1. Trim the beets: Remove the greens and trim the root end. 
  2. Cook the beets either by roasting in the oven (per instructions noted above in the intro), or in an Instant Pot. If using an Instant Pot, place whole beets on the rack insert. Add 1 cup of water to the pot. Place the top in the sealing position, and pressure cook the beets for 35 minutes. If you have the time, let the pressure release naturally. If not, wait 10 minutes and release the pressure. Let the beets cool. The skin should slip right off the beets easily. Quarter each beet and then slice.
  3. In a large bowl, add all the ingredients and toss to combine. Adjust seasonings to taste. Serve and enjoy!
Categories
Cucumber Edible Floers Eggs Garlic Herbs Microgreens Olive Oil Onions Radish Shallots Snap peas

Snap Pea and Radish Salad  

Words and photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms

This is a true farmer’s lunch — real fast food, if you will! It shines with things you could walk onto a farm, pull from the ground or the coop and be ready to eat in about 10 minutes! It is a delightful spring salad that satisfies my lunch time desires for something fresh, light while adding interest with sweet and tangy notes. Simply put everything in a bowl as you prep, toss with dressing and you’re ready to go.

Because I really wanted a chopped and crunchy salad, I used out-of-season cucumbers (I couldn’t resist!), but you can omit and focus on our gorgeous spring greens instead. You might add some fresh goat cheese, cooked white beans or chickpeas for added depth, hearty layers and extra protein. Make enough for a few meals, and use up within three days to avoid soggy bites, or toss and simply keep the dressing separate until ready to serve.

Right now radishes are in abundance! Help your local farmers out by snagging a couple bunches this week. You need a full bunch for this recipe (more if you love radishes like I do!). Get extra and pickle them alongside some onions for an extra special taco topping. I love pulling one out each day to put on top of whatever salad or sandwich I make for lunch. Yum!

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. snap peas
  • 1 bunch radishes
  • 4 Persian cucumbers (optional)
  • 2 spring onions or shallots
  • 1 garlic clove, grated
  • ¼ cup fresh chopped herbs such as parsley, wild onion/chives and dill
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar 
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • For serving: hard boiled eggs, microgreens, edible flowers

Directions

  1. Prep vegetables for the salad. Lay snap peas down and cut roughly into thirds. The radishes were thinly sliced into half moons, as were the cucumbers. I sliced the shallots into rings and tossed everything in a large bowl. 
  2. Make the dressing right on top of the vegetables: grate the garlic clove, juice the lemon, and add the remaining ingredients. Toss to combine. EAT! 
Categories
Beets Garlic Olive Oil Onions Thyme

Beet and Black Bean Burgers

Words and photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms

As the last of the beets come out of the winter fields, grab some this week and try your hand at some veggie burgers! Beets in burgers? You read it right! I’ve made many veggie burger recipes over the years, and from endless combinations of beans, greens, mushrooms and other produce. In my former life as a dedicated vegetarian, I was always in search of a vegetable-centered recipe to replace those frozen dishes at the store with mile-long ingredient lists. After experimenting through my share of blends, this by far is my favorite combination that results in a moist, earthy, flavorful “burger” patty. 

This recipe is very versatile, provided you ensure everything is well cooked, and I have modified the recipe many different ways over the years. You can roast the beets, use leftover rice, etc. and still be pretty much guaranteed a winning result. Pair with some fresh roasted potato fries and a seasonal salad or fruit for a complete, nutritious and delicious meal.     

Adapted from this recipe 

Ingredients
1/2 cup rice 

1 onion, diced small

3 large red beets, peeled and diced small

3-4 cloves garlic, minced

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

1 can black beans, drained and rinsed

Juice from 1/2 lemon

4 tablespoons oil, divided 

1 teaspoon coriander

1/2 teaspoon thyme

2 tablespoons flour

Salt and pepper to taste

For serving: cheese slices, sauerkraut, pickled jalapeños, condiments of choice

Directions

  1. Bring a large amount of water to a boil. Add a handful of salt and the rice, and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook the rice until it’s a little beyond al dente. You want it a little over-cooked, but still firm. This should take about 25-30 minutes. Drain the rice and set it aside.
  2. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion, reduce the heat to medium, and cook until the onions are translucent and softened. Stir in the beets. Cover the pot and cook until the beets are completely tender, stirring occasionally. Depending on the size of the beets, this can take anywhere from 10-20 minutes. Smaller is better! Add the garlic and cook until it is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Deglaze the pan using the cider vinegar.
  3. Empty the black beans into a large bowl and use a fork to mash them up a bit. Add the cooked rice, the beet and onion mixture, the lemon juice, and all the spices. Stir to combine and then taste for seasonings. Add salt and pepper to taste. Once it tastes the way you like it, add the flour and stir until you see no more dry flour.
  4. Using your hands, scoop up about a cup of the burger mixture and shape it into a patty between your palms. Place on a plate and repeat until all the mixture has been used. This should make 6 large-sized burgers. We made some smaller ones for lunch portions the next day. 
  5. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add a few tablespoons of oil – enough to completely coat the bottom of the pan.
  6. Once the oil is hot, place burgers in the pan. Once all the patties are in the pan, reduce the heat to medium-high.
  7. Cook the patties for 2-4 minutes, then flip them to the other side. You should see a nice crust on the cooked side. If they break apart a little when you flipped them, just reshape them with the spatula – they’ll hold together once the second side is cooked. 
  8. If you’re adding cheese, lay a slice over the burgers now. Cook the second side for another 2 minutes. Remove and serve how you’d like: with buns or without!
Categories
Bacon Carrots Celery Garlic Olive Oil Onions Potatoes Recipes Turnips

Roasted Winter Vegetable Soup with Guanciale and Celery Salad Topping

Words and photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms

Ready for another super easy, super versatile and super delicious recipe? Keep on reading! I love roasted turnips: the cooking process brings out the sweetness of this misunderstood root veggie and makes them approachable for those who shy away. That said, turnips do tend to have a “love ‘em or hate ‘em” reputation, so I wanted to make something that would be appealing to fans and could-be fans alike. Soup seemed a natural place to start with its cozy vibe well-suited for our current cold temperatures.

But, how could I make unconvinced turnip eaters more interested? Enter the ever-popular garden darlings: potatoes and carrots. By pureeing and blending the turnips with these beloved add-ins, you get the best of both worlds: full, rich flavor without the pronounced turnip twang. Win!

If you’re still unsure, let me give you a little firm-but-polite nudge. Put your support-the-farmers-money-where-your-mouth-is, step outside your comfort zone and bring a variety of vegetables and meat cuts into your home. Buy the turnips, grab and cure the pork jowl and let’s get these overlooked items onto your plate! 

Pro tip: Save all your resulting veggie peelings to make stock. Keep a freezer bag in your freezer and add onion, carrot and celery peelings/ends until it’s full. Mushroom stems, some potato peelings and herbs stems are other great additions, but steer clear of brassica items (cabbage, kale, broccoli, etc.). Once the bag is full, add to a large pot or stock pot with leftover bones, cover with water, bring to a boil and simmer on low for three to four hours (or longer if you wish). Add water as needed to keep ingredients covered while they cook. Strain and enjoy!

INGREDIENTS
2 turnips, peeled and coarsely chopped
2 potatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped
2 pounds carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
1 large onion or several small, coarsely chopped
2 stalks celery, leaves removed and saved, cut into large chunks
2 heads of garlic
1 handful of roasting blend of fresh herbs, chopped (or more to taste)
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper
4 slices guanciale or thick-cut bacon, sliced into lardons (small strips or cubes)
6 cups stock
½ lemon, juiced

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 425.
  2. On a large rimmed sheet pan, layer all the vegetables in a single layer, using two pans if you must (you won’t get the charred edges with an overcrowded pan). Drizzle with oil, season aggressively with salt, pepper, and herbs. Toss to coat. Roast in the oven for about 30 minutes until charred in spots, flipping and rotating pan halfway through cooking time.
  3. While the vegetables cook, mince the celery leaves and place in a small bowl. Add lemon juice and cracked black pepper. Mix thoroughly, set aside.
  4. In a large soup pot set over medium heat, crisp the jowl or bacon pieces. Remove from heat, set aside. Remove all but 1-2 tablespoons of the fat from the pot. 
  5. When the vegetables are done, place in a high-power blender with 2 cups of stock and puree until smooth. Alternatively, put vegetables and stock into the soup pot and use an immersion blender to puree.
  6. Pour the puree into the soup pot and set to low heat. Add the rest of the stock and simmer over low heat for 5-10 minutes to allow the flavors to come together. Adjust seasoning to your liking.

To serve: ladle soup into bowls. Top each with crispy guanciale or bacon pieces and a scoop of the celery leaf salad. I also was thinking a chili oil would perk it up nicely as well. Enjoy!

Substitutions: The vegetables are pretty interchangeable here. Try rutabaga, squash — whatever you’ve got in the fridge that needs to be used. If you’re vegetarian/vegan, replace the pork with chickpeas roasted in a hot oven until crispy and browned.

Categories
Baked Food Garlic Olive Oil Onions Parmesan cheese Recipes Sausage Sweet Potatoes

Sheet Pan Sweet Potato Gnocchi

Recipe & photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms
I’m a big fan of “sheet pan” meals — those glorious, easy-peasy all-in-one dishes perfect for quick and healthy dinners. They are incredibly versatile and (mostly) require minimal attention. Think of them as an ideal “clean out the fridge” technique great for pairing local ingredients you often don’t know what to do with: combine proteins, veggies, and starches however you feel moved. I love putting fresh greens on the top toward the end of cooking, too, like in this recipe! 

My friend recently passed along a huge sweet potato from his garden, and I had a bunch of radicchio that I honestly didn’t have a plan for but was excited to use. I thought both would pair well with sausage and debated how to proceed. I was leaning towards a soup, but then remembered I had a couple packages of cauliflower gnocchi in the freezer, and I LOVE roasted gnocchi. Whether it’s frozen cauliflower gnocchi or the shelf stable potato based gnocchi, if you haven’t tried roasting it, you’re missing out my friends! Gnocchi is traditionally boiled like pasta, but when roasted the edges become brown and toasty taking on a nutty flavor that is perfection when paired with fall flavors like sweet potatoes and sage. 

Try this easy sheet pan meal this week and make sure to snap a pic and tag us on social media! 

Ingredients

  • 1 large or 2 medium sweet potatoes, diced 
  • 1 onion, sliced 
  • 2 packages of cauliflower gnocchi (10 oz each), frozen, or 1 package of potato gnocchi (16 oz.)
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper (about 1 tsp salt and ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper)
  • About 10 sage leaves, chiffonade (sliced thinly)
  • 2 stalks of rosemary, minced
  • 4 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, divided
  • 1 pound Italian sausage
  • 1 bunch of local radicchio, sliced into ribbons
  • Parmesan cheese and crushed red pepper for serving

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. 
  2. Use two sheet pans (pictured here is just one, however, my sheet pans are full sized and most people have half sized, so use two for better browning of ingredients) and cover each with a Silpat mat, parchment paper, or aluminum foil.
  3. Place sweet potatoes, onion, and gnocchi onto the pans. Drizzle everything with two tablespoons of the olive oil. Season with salt, pepper, sage, rosemary, garlic, and two tablespoons of balsamic vinegar. Toss everything to combine. Spread out evenly. Break up the sausage with your hands and nestle small pieces of the sausage among the potatoes and gnocchi.
  4. Place it in the oven for 25 minutes. The sweet potatoes and gnocchi should be beginning to brown.
  5. In a small bowl, toss the radicchio with the remaining one tablespoon of olive oil and vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. 
  6. Remove pans from the oven. Toss all the ingredients on the sheet pans. Scatter radicchio on top. Place back in the oven and cook for an additional five minutes until the radicchio starts to crisp on the edges. 
  7. Remove and serve with cheese and crushed red pepper, if desired. 
Categories
Butter Garlic Olive Oil Rabbit Recipes

Beer and Herb Braised Rabbit

Recipe and photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms

As the seasons change, I begin to crave more substantial flavors. This dish is a beautiful collaboration of summer fresh herbs paired with a robust but light German wheat ale. The rich gravy served with mashed potatoes has the feeling of a more wintery meal, but is countered by the lightness of herbs and rabbit.

When I ordered the rabbit through CAFE, it arrived in a package of eight pieces, including the liver and kidney. I put the liver in the freezer to make pate in the coming winter months. 

The German wheat ale is from Pendleton Brewing Co., which opened last fall. Give it a try, or purchase your favorite local brew. If you choose a different beer to use in the braise, my only word of caution is to think about the balance of bitter and sweet. If you choose a hoppy IPA, I might be inclined to add a small amount of honey to brighten the dish. 

A note about the herbs and spices: I tried to create a fresh version of Herbes de Provence. I used one stalk each of tarragon, oregano, rosemary and lavender alongside several basil leaves and a few thyme stalks. This was my flavor profile, but you could use anything! If you don’t have fresh herbs, try a generous tablespoon of dried Herbs de Provence. If possible, grind your own coriander to impart a bolder flavor than pre-ground versions. Coriander is often used in brewing American wheat ales, and I thought it would add brightness to the German wheat ale while adding a level of flavor beyond the herbs. If you use ground coriander, I might just add a smidge more that the recipe dictates.

Beer and Herb Braised Rabbit

Ingredients: 
8 pc. rabbit (approximately two pounds)
Salt and pepper
4 tablespoons butter, divided 
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 
1 onion, sliced
2 to 4 cloves of garlic,  minced 
2 heaping tablespoons fresh herbs OR 1 TB dried herbs (Herbes de Provence would be lovely)
1 (heaping) teaspoon coriander seeds, ground
1 1/2 cups of German wheat ale 
2 tablespoons flour

Directions:
1. Liberally season one side of rabbit pieces with salt and pepper. 

2. In a Dutch oven over medium high heat, melt 2 tablespoons each of the butter and oil. When the oil becomes fragrant, place the seasoned side of the rabbit down into the pan. Cook for 2 minutes without touching or disturbing the meat to create a nice sear. Season the face-up side of the meat with salt and pepper. Turn the meat over and sear the other side. Remove the meat from the pan to a clean plate. Set aside. 

3. Reduce the heat down to medium/medium low and add the sliced onion to the pan. Let the onion cook until translucent for about 5-6 minutes. Add the garlic, coriander, and herbs. Stir to incorporate for another minute. 

4. Turn the heat up to high and slowly pour in the beer, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Allow the beer to cook off the alcohol over high heat for a minute or two. You should see steam rising. 

4. Turn the heat down to the lowest setting. Add the rabbit back into the pan with any accumulated juices. Spoon the onion/herb/beer mixture on top. Cover with lid and allow the rabbit to cook for 20-30 minutes. This depends largely on how low you can go and how much the meat is already cooked from searing as to how long it will take! I checked mine right under 30 minutes and it was cooked perfectly; the meat had pulled from the leg bone. 

5. Meanwhile, add the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter (hopefully it has softened now) to a small bowl. Combine the butter and flour and mash with a fork to create a paste. 

6. When the rabbit is done, remove the meat from the pan to a plate (keep warm). With a whisk, add the butter paste and whisk into the remaining sauce and allow to simmer and thicken for about 3 minutes. Add the rabbit back to the pan! 

7. Serve over mashed potatoes, pasta, rice or with crusty bread – you will want to soak up all that rich gravy! 

Categories
Eggplant Garlic Olive Oil Recipes Tomatoes

Silky Eggplant Pasta

by Amanda Callahan

Cooking eggplant well and pairing it with pasta hides the texture and highlights this adaptable vegetable. I love using the long purple variety; I find it less bitter and the skin is tasty, too, as long as it is cooked enough.

If you use the larger, Black Beauty variety, one tip to make it more palatable is to slice it in circles, lightly salt each one, stack them up and let them hang out together for about 20 minutes. This method seasons the eggplant, and the water that seeps out supposedly carries away any bitterness.

A note on the tomatoes: every year, I enjoy dehydrating tomato slices to use in sauces, salads, and even seasoned as “tomato chips” throughout the year. I’ve used them here. You can sub a jar of sun dried tomatoes from the store, but you can also roast cherry tomato halves in an oven for about thirty minutes, too!

Photo and recipe by Amanda Callahan

Ingredients

  • 1 pound long purple eggplant, cut into ½-inch slices
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to finish
  • 3 garlic cloves, smashed
  • Leaves from 2 sprigs thyme or oregano, chopped
  • 1 cup stock or water
  • 1 pound pasta, such as spaghetti
  • Handful of dehydrated tomatoes, chopped OR 4 sun dried tomatoes from a jar OR handful of roasted cherry tomatoes 
  • 6 to 10 leaves of basil, thinly sliced
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Pour the oil into a wide, heavy saucepan, add the garlic cloves, and cook over low heat. It will take a few minutes to smell the aroma and hear the sizzle.
  2. When you smell and hear it, drop in your eggplant slices and herbs, and stir to combine. Turn up the heat to medium-high, add salt and pepper and stir. When the eggplant starts to turn translucent and soften, add the liquid and let it come to a boil. Turn it back down to low. Let it bubble for a bit. Stir once in a while, so the bottom doesn’t stick.
  3. While the eggplant is softening, bring a large pot of salted water to boil and cook the pasta to al dente.
  4. While the pasta cooks, check on the eggplant. The liquid should be mostly absorbed or reduced after about 20 minutes of cooking. Once it is fully soft, mash it up with a spoon or potato masher, and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. Add the tomatoes, half of the basil, and season again if needed. 
  5. Drain the pasta and toss with the eggplant sauce. Serve with basil, crushed red pepper, Parmesan cheese or a little more oil! 
Categories
Leeks Olive Oil Onions Recipes

Charred Onion Dip


Original recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen; variations suggested by CAFE
Photos by Ellie Sharp

This is a very simple dip that gets rave reviews at holiday gatherings but is right at home any time of year. Try it with your favorite snack crackers or use as a sandwich spread. Toss in different herbs or add sliced jalapeño or serrano peppers before charring the onions for a kick of heat (rings of poblano are a nice non-spicy option). Play around and let the seasonal bounty inspire you!

Categories
Celery Olive Oil Onions Recipes

Ellen’s Quinoa Dressing

A great side dish any day of the year!